About Amr Ebied

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I am an Egyptian physician studying health care business administration in the University of Akron in Ohio. I have a medical background in internal medicine, but I have always been fond of natural treatments and providing a simple understanding of medications to the common non-academic person. That's why I started blogging about certain medications that interested people at certain times. Currently I work in Summa Health system in Akron as a performance solutions intern. I have finished both Spring and Summer Semesters with a grade of A. Although I am indulged now in health care MBA, but I am still attracted to my profession as a doctor and is very much challenged when I see someone seeking help as regards explaining things about pharmaceuticals and treatments. That's why I think sharing my knowledge and expertise with all the respected members of that valuable blog will be a great opportunity for me to interact with every one of you and share opinions on different medical and health care issues that are emerging worldwide.

About the Author

Dr Amr Ebied's picture
Author: Dr Amr Ebied

Comments

Ph. Bhagavan P S RPh's picture

I have a feeling that with the entry of professionals like you and Dr Rezahaider the field will get a much needed patient focused orientation. I look forward for your blogs. Good wishes.

Bhagavan P.S. B Pharm

Rtd. Dy Dir.(Pharmacy),Govt of Karnataka, India
Dr Amr Ebied's picture

Hi Bhagavan I am very much touched by your kind comment. You are certainly right. From a physician's point of view, I find that patient focused care is a rare thing to talk about these days. Most of the highlights wandering these days are concerned about the fate of Obama Care and whether it will survive the challenges waiting ahead of it in the hands of Politicians. But from a healthcare professional's point of view, I find that if we only focused on the patient, we would be unfair to the system as a whole. A fair health care professional should keep an eye on his patient, facility, staff and money. He should give the patient quality health care, at the most cost-effective price, while keeping in mind that he should use his returns from his service to develop both his staff and his facility. I think the trick is to best manage the cooperation between physicians and health care managers. What do you think ?

Amr

Ph. Bhagavan P S RPh's picture

Thank you Dr Amr Ebied. The Indian therapeutic system base is typically ;Topsy-turvy' Medicines and formulations are not made keeping the utility value in view. It is made to: 1. By-pass the price control order. 2. Gimmick to claim some (unfounded) superiority over other makes 3. Earn more profit through easy formulation and processing 4. Easy marketing by imitating a popular brand / make 5. Magnify and glorify some expression in a corner of some popular reference book (like Goodman & Gillman) to claim some mileage. In therapeutics, the pharmacist should supply the drugs as per indent / prescription. But the irony is prescription is written not based on the specific need but by matching the available drug with the patient's need! This is happening because the authority according approval to manufacture any drug / formulation is under petrochemical ministry whose objective is to promote industry and business. National Health policy is timid enough to distance itself from telling the industry what is needed and what is not needed. Our doctors who can definitely wield the whip and tell the industry that they wouldn't prescribe their product unless the molecule and formulations are need based, rational and competitive in price. But they won't do that! Simple example: We don't get simple formulation of Iron-folic acid which is theee best haematinic that can be used universally. But we get thousands of very expensive iron formulations in glamorous packing! The question remains: WHO WILL LOOK INTO PATIENT'S INTEREST?

Bhagavan P.S. B Pharm

Rtd. Dy Dir.(Pharmacy),Govt of Karnataka, India

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